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#3. Mega Man X (1994, Capcom)

The Mega Man series was getting old, so Capcom decided to enhance the series with an entirely new take on the series, plus a brand new Blue Bomber. Enemies are thrown at you so much you’re crying uncle, but this gives you an opportunity to improve your skills until you’re a force to be reckoned with. There are lots of environments to fight in that always fit the boss–on the snow level, you’ll be fighting a penguin. On the sea level, you’ll be fighting an octopus. This made Mega Man from a hero in the NES library to a hero in the future. What put MMX so high on my list is that it was very addictive and I’d find myself burning through the game, a few levels in one sitting. This game sharpened my gaming senses, made me think, turned me into a freaking tiger! Easily the best MMX on the SNES, and easily the second-best Mega Man yet. Behind Mega Man 2, of course.

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#2. Super Castlevania IV (1991, Konami)

Simon Belmont’s on a quest to defeat Dracula, and never has it been so indulgent. I’m not a diehard Castlevania fan, but I quickly found myself sucked into 1691 Transylvania with the game’s magnificent gameplay and increasing difficulty. The game’s soundtrack is a gorgeous mix of new songs as well as remixes of old classics, it takes an old concept for a new spin, and all of these new introductions to the series’ legacy is what makes SCIV a gem among the SNES adventure games. That’s why it made it so high up on my ladder–it reinvented itself and looked good while doing it. But it is no match for the best SNES game of all time. I can’t believe it’s been so underrated by gamers. It’s what opened my eyes to the Super Nintendo. Boys and girls, my greatest Super Nintendo Entertainment System video game of all time is…

(Are you ready?

Are you sure?

Y’know, you can’t go back.

Positive?

100%?

Is this your final answer?

Well, if you say so…)

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